What is the recommended testing procedure for the coronavirus disease?

Reading time: 2 minutes

The CDC recommends a COVID-19 test called a nasopharyngeal swab. The technician will put a special 6-inch cotton swab up both sides of your nose and move it around for about 15 seconds. It won't hurt, but it might be uncomfortable. They'll send the swab to a lab to test the material from inside your nose.

What happens if I get the coronavirus disease?

People with COVID-19 generally develop signs and symptoms, including mild respiratory symptoms and fever, on an average of 5-6 days after infection (mean incubation period 5-6 days, range 1-14 days). Most people infected with COVID-19 virus have mild disease and recover.

Is there a vaccine under development for the coronavirus?

Experts at the National Institutes of Health and other organizations have begun work to develop a vaccine for this new strain of coronavirus. Scientists are just getting started on this work, but their vaccine development strategy will benefit both from work that has been done on closely related viruses.

What constitutes 'close contact' with someone who has the coronavirus disease?

You generally need to be in close contact with a sick person to get infected. Close contact includes: Living in the same household as a sick person with COVID-19, Caring for a sick person with COVID-19, Being within 6 feet of a sick person with COVID-19 for about 10 minutes

Are there any medications I should avoid taking if I have the coronavirus disease?

Currently, there is no evidence to show that taking ibuprofen or naproxen can lead to a more severe infection of COVID-19. People with high blood pressure should take their blood pressure medications, as directed, and work with their healthcare provider to make sure that their blood pressure is as well controlled as possible. Any changes to your medications should only be made by your healthcare provider.

Are people with disabilities at higher risk of contracting the coronavirus disease?

See full answer Most people with disabilities are not inherently at higher risk for becoming infected with or having severe illness from COVID-19. Some people with physical limitations or other disabilities might be at a higher risk of infection because of their underlying medical condition. People with certain disabilities might experience higher rates of chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk of serious illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. Adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer than adults without disabilities. You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.